Clinical Eye Tracker

Clinical Eye Tracker

The Clinical Eye Tracker is an exciting new tool to accurately assess eye movements and binocular vision.

How Does the Clinical Eye Tracker Work?

The system incorporates a small bar mounted below a computer screen, with three infrared cameras that detect even the subtlest of eye movements at around 60 movements per second. A wide range of test stimuli can be presented, so it is not just limited to words on a page. The system uses complex algorithms to show statistics related to reading performance and direct comparisons can be made under different visual conditions, i.e., with and without glasses or intuitive coloured overlays.

<h3>How Does the Clinical Eye Tracker Work?</h3> <p>The system incorporates a small bar mounted below a computer screen, with three infrared cameras that detect even the subtlest of eye movements at around 60 movements per second. A wide range of test stimuli can be presented, so it is not just limited to words on a page. The system uses complex algorithms to show statistics related to reading performance and direct comparisons can be made under different visual conditions, i.e., with and without glasses or intuitive coloured overlays.</p> <p> </p>

This equipment is particularly beneficial in detecting subtle defects which could potentially cause significant difficulties and discomfort. It would be especially useful in children or adults with reading difficulties or who may be exhibiting signs such as lack of concentration or headaches after long periods of screen use. It is an excellent method of quantitively showing the objective benefits to a person’s eye movements and therefore visual quality for close tasks.

Who should have Eye Tracking?

Eye-tracking is suitable for both adults and children and is recommended on a case-by-case basis. The specialist optometrist will only recommend Eye Tracking after an eye examination or following an initial Visual Stress Assessment.

<h3>Who should have Eye Tracking?</h3> <p>Eye-tracking is suitable for both adults and children and is recommended on a case-by-case basis. The specialist optometrist will only recommend Eye Tracking after an eye examination or following an initial Visual Stress Assessment.</p>

Eye Tracking for Dyslexic Readers

Symptoms frequently observed in dyslexic readers, which include skipping letters or words, losing one’s place and or using their fingers to keep their place can be caused by tracking issues. Eye-tracking recordings allow us to literally observe a child’s eye movements, as they read a passage of text, and this provides a brilliant opportunity to study their reading development.

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